Active Standard

IEEE C37.122.3-2011

IEEE Guide for Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) Gas Handling for High-Voltage (over 1000 Vac) Equipment

Significant aspects of handling SF6 gas used in electric power equipment such as gas recovery, reclamation, recycling in order to keep the gas permanently in a closed cycle and avoiding any deliberate release in environment are described. The purpose of this guide is to provide state-of-the-art technologies and procedures to minimize SF6 gas emission to a minimum functional level for the electric power equipment to preserve the environment. This guide will include all the aspects for consideration during commissioning and recommissioning, topping up, refilling, checking the gas quality at site, sampling and shipment for off-site gas analysis, and recovering and reclaiming during normal operation and at the end of the life of power equipment while dismantling. This guide also presents the state-of-the art tools and measuring devices including the necessary personnel protective equipment. The basis for the preparation of this guide is CIGRE Brochure No. 276, Guide for preparation of customized "Practical SF6 handling instructions," August 2005 edition, developed by the Study Committee B3, Task Force B3.02.01.

Sponsor Committee
PE/SUB - Substations
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Joint Sponsors
PE/SWG
Status
Active Standard
PAR Approval
2008-06-12
Board Approval
2011-10-31
History
ANSI Approved:
2013-01-14
Published:
2012-01-09

Working Group Details

Society
IEEE Power and Energy Society
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Sponsor Committee
PE/SUB - Substations
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Working Group
WGK4 - SF6 Gas Handling for High Voltage Equipment
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IEEE Program Manager
Ashley Moran
Contact
Working Group Chair
Billy Lao

PC37.122.3

Guide for Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) Gas Handling for High-Voltage (over 1000 Vac) Equipment

This guide describes aspects of the handling of SF6 gas used in electric power equipment, such as gas filling, recovery, reclamation, testing, quality analysis and recycling, in order to keep the gas permanently in a closed loop system and to avoid any release into the environment.

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No Superseded Standards
No Inactive-Withdrawn Standards
No Inactive-Reserved Standards
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